MEASUREMENTS



With any recipe, proportions are pretty much what will decipher if your meal tastes good.

Did your dough rise? Was your cake spongy and moist? Was that cut seasoned to your liking?


Measurement.

In America since we're the oddballs, we use the US Standard System (also known as the imperial system). We are 1 of 3 countries in the world who do NOT use the Metric System.


(pictured above: a dancing cheeseburger)



In 4th grade, my math teacher Ms. Bowen taught me something that still to this day I refer to.

A life changer. THE BIG G.

**shout out to you Ms B**

Yeah its literally a big G.

And crammed with some other letters....

BUT REALLY, it is so, so, so useful, lemme break it down for you.






G - GALLON

Q - QUART

P - PINT

C - CUP





4 quarts in 1 gallon, 2 pints in 1 quart, 2 cups in 1 pint, etc.

This bad boy hung in the classroom on a piece of paper several feet in size.


It's simple, it's easy, I get it.

But, with converting mass and volumes on recipes, it really is such as what it is nicknamed...an imperial system.

A cup of lavender, and a cup of roses may each fully fill the measuring device, but they most likely wont weigh the same. Each weight will give a different amount of flavor or color, so in this sense using measurements, by the cup just doesn't wont work.



Here is a simple conversion chart to refer back to when times in the kitchen can get a little confusing.



**conversions rounded to nearest equivelance


IMPERIAL METRIC

-WEIGHT-


1/2 OZ 14 grams

1 OZ 28 grams

2 OZ 56 grams

1/4 LB (4oz) 113 grams

1/2 LB (8oz) 227 grams

3/4 LB (12oz) 340 grams

1 LB (16oz) 454 grams

2 LB (32OZ) 908 grams


-VOLUME-


1/4 teaspoon 1 mL

1 teaspoon 5 mL

1 tablespoon 15 mL

1/8 cup 30 mL

1/4 cup 60 mL

1/3 cup 80 mL

1/2 cup 120 mL

2/3 cup 160 mL

3/4 cup 180 mL

1 cup 240 mL



-LIQUID-


1 oz 15 mL

2 oz 30 mL

2 oz 30 mL

4 oz 85 mL

5 oz 115 mL

6 oz 140 mL

7 oz 170 mL

8 oz 230 mL

9 oz 260 mL

10 oz 285 mL

11 oz 210 mL

12 oz 340 mL